Environmental Responsibility

Preparing for the future

London Southend Airport affects the community it lives in, and part of our ethos is to prepare for the future. This means we are aware of our environmental impact and seek to minimise and mitigate it. This page gives an overview of our environmental management programme, both current and planned for the future.

Noise mapping studies carried out in 2006 have been published by DEFRA. Please click to view noise maps during 24 hours and at night. For further information please see the DEFRA website. You can Download the Noise Action Plan which was adopted in August 2014

Follow this link to information about aircraft noise restrictions and maximum size. Detailed instructions are given to pilots about operations at Southend Airport, and these can be found on the NATS AIS site, through the Flight Planning page. The instructions include noise abatement procedures which require operations to cause the least disturbance practicable. In particular, from Runway 23, propeller aircraft must climb to 600ft, and jet aircraft to 1000ft (1500ft at night), before turning. The ground running of aircraft engines is limited to the daytime and in certain specified areas of the Airport.

Comments and complaints about aircraft noise can be made to the Airport and a response is normally given. The comments and the Airport’s response are then reviewed by the independent Airport Consultative Committee.

Aviation accounts for 6% of UK CO2 emissions and 1.6% of global greenhouse gas emissions. For details of what the aviation industry is doing see www.sustainableaviation.co.uk. The European Union’s Emissions Trading Scheme is to include aviation from 2011. Emissions Trading means that the total amount of carbon will be limited, from whatever source, and it is therefore the best way to achieve the objective of mitigating the effects on climate.

An estimate by the Carbon Trust of the CO2 produced at London Southend over which the Airport has direct control (essentially the energy consumed in heating and lighting in the Airport’s own buildings plus external, including airfield, lighting) for 2006 is 431 tonnes. The Carbon Trust recommended energy saving measures which could reduce this by 6%, although energy consumption could reduce energy consumption in the terminal building by 27%.The Carbon Trust also estimated that the Airport’s tenants produced 4315 tonnes of CO2 in 2006.

A 2002 baseline air quality assessment indicated that most pollutants were below objective levels. An air quality study is required within six months of the commencement of development of the new terminal.

A baseline ecological assessment was undertaken in 2003 which identified protected species in the vicinity of the airport. Primarily for reasons of aircraft safety, the Airport manages its extensive areas of grass in such a way that there is a relatively low level of disturbance.

The 2003 baseline assessment indicated a low risk to the aquifer. Surface water features have poor quality water, but are not worsened by runoff from the Airport. Interceptors were replaced in 2007. Details of drainage for new terminal are to be agreed by local authority.

The 2003 baseline assessment indicated a low risk to the aquifer. Surface water features have poor quality water, but are not worsened by runoff from the Airport. Interceptors were replaced in 2007. Details of drainage for new terminal are to be agreed by local authority.

London Southend Airport has a long history which is covered in some detail on the Airport History page. The Airport is also home to the Vulcan Restoration Trust.

St Laurence and All Saints Church is located close to the end of the runway. Previous plans have sought to relocate the church because parts of it infringe various safeguarding requirements. However, these variations have been accepted by the Civil Aviation Authority and consideration is now being given to how the safety of the runway operation can be improved with the church in its current position.

An Airport Transport Forum has been established and a Surface Access Strategy published.

94% of staff live in Southend postcodes. 7% of staff car share, 3% use bus, 5% walk, 15% cycle or motorcycle and 70% drive alone.